18 Brigham Creek Road
Whenuapai
Auckland 0618
New Zealand
The Herb Patch
Let your food be medicine and your medicine be food

Angelica Shiny Leaf

(Angelica Pachycarpa)

There are many varieties of angelica and almost all varieties possess medicinal values and each seems to have its own unique healing properties.  

Angelica is not one of those mainstream herbs. Some species are used for culinary purposes and some are sold for ornamental purposes only. All angelica seems to have a licorice-like scent and flavour.  

We used to grow Angelica Archangelica which is suitable for culinary purposes but since most of our customers are using the angelica for decorative purposes we decided to replace Angelica Archangelica with Angelica Pachycarpa, more commonly known as Angelica Shiny Leaf.  

When we were growing Angelica Archangelica, I used the angelica to flavour my roast vegetables – I simply chopped up the angelica leaves with the stem and tossed it into my roast vegetables with the oil and pepper. I also used angelica leaves with baked fish – just lined the angelica leaves on the baking tray, put the fish on top with a small knob of butter, a couple slices of red chili and a couple of slices of lime and baked it in the oven for approximately 10 mins to 12 mins. 

The above picture shows our young Angelica Shiny Leaf crop. We have put mulch around each plant to keep the moisture in, as angelica plants thrive in that environment. This particular batch took about 8 weeks to germinate into seedling. The first leaves were rounded and the serrated edges are not obvious. It takes months to get established. However, once the angelica plant is established, they are quite hardy and will continue to produce beautiful fresh green leaves for 2 to 3 years. 

Angelica Shiny Leaf is such a beautiful plant with bright shiny leaves, no wonder it is popular for decoration. We would love to learn from you if you know other uses for this angelica. 

Apparently there are more than 50 varieties of angelica and almost all varieties possess medicinal values and each has its own unique healing properties. Angelica archangelica is known as European Angelica.

For me, I use Angelica to flavour my roast vegetables – I simply chopped up the angelica leaves with the stem, toss into my roast vegetables with the oil and pepper. I also use angelica leaves with baked fish – just lined the angelica leaves on the baking tray, put the fish on top with a small knob of better, a couple of slices of red chillie and a couple of slices of lime and bake in the oven – approximately 10 mins to 12 mins.

The above picture shows our young angelica crop. We have put mulch around each plant to keep the moisture in, as angelica plants do well in moist soil. This particular batch took about 8 weeks to germinate into seedling. The first leaves were rounded and the serrated edges are not obvious. It takes months to get established. However, once the angelica plant is established, they are quite hardy and will continue to produce beautiful fresh green leaves for 2 to 3 years.

Angelica is such a beautiful plant, no wonder it is popular for decoration. We would love to learn from you if you know of other uses of Angelica.

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